Archive for July, 2015

BOOK REVIEW COMPETITION RESULTS

Last term we ran a BOOK REVIEW COMPETITION and we received many fantastic entries from across all year levels. As promised we have selected the best six reviews (and one Encouragement Award) and the students who wrote them were all awarded with a certificate and their choice of a brand new book from a selection in the library! All of the suitable reviews (including the winners) will live on forever in our library’s catalogue in the entry for that book.

And the winners are:

Millie Beswick-Wright – Year 7 for her review of The Vanishing Girls by Lauren Oliver

Abbie Liptrot – Year 8 for her review of All I Know Now by Carrie Hope Fletcher

Lily Veal – Year 8 for her review of A Storm of Swords by George R.R. Martin

Makita Stendt – Year 9 for her review of Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Patterson

Maddison Lewis – Year 10 for her review of Revived by Cat Patrick

Ethan Waters – Year 12 for his review of The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

Encouragement Award goes to Nicholas Duong – Year 7 for his review of Run by Tim Sinclair

A big THANK-YOU to all students who entered, they were all great entries! Remember, the library is always happy to accept book reviews, just follow the SUBMIT BOOK REVIEWS link on the left of this page.

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CiNECiTY – DOG DAY AFTERNOON

dog_day_afternoon (1)This afternoon we screen the 1975 Oscar winning Dog Day Afternoon.

Directors: Sidney Lumet

Cast: Al Pacino

John Cazale

James Broderick

Chris Sarandon

Written By: Frank Pierson

Genre: Crime / Drama / Comedy

Rating: M

Duration: 120 min

Colour: Colour

Released: 1975

Country/Language: USA / English

BACKGROUND NOTES:

  • The film received positive reviews and was nominated for multiple Golden Globes and Academy Awards. It won the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay.
  • It was based on real life events. In August 1972 John Wojtowicz and Sal Naturale attempted to rob a Brooklyn bank and held the staff hostage for 14 hours. Though based on real events and people, John Wojtowicz claims that only about 30% of the events really happened the way the film portrays. He wrote this letter to the New York Times to tell his side of the story. His article was not published in the newspaper.

THINGS TO THINK ABOUT:

  • Do you think the filmmakers succeed in making you believe this really happened? Do you feel as though it’s happening as you watch? What techniques do they use to achieve this?
  • Why do you think the public were supportive of Sonny and Sal and not the police in the movie? Why were they cheering for bank robbers?
  • Do you think Sonny’s motivation for wanting money justified him robbing the bank and holding people hostage? Was it worth it in the end?