WELCOME TO FOOTSCRAY CITY’S OPEN DAY

Welcome one and all to Footscray City College’s annual Open Day! This is a fantastic opportunity for us to share what we do with the wider community and to give prospective students and their families an idea about some of the wonderful programs, experiences and services we have to offer. If you’re here on the day, make sure you check out all the great displays and activities around the school. In some areas there will be Passport Activities for kids to take part in, such as drumming in Music, a sports challenge in the Gym, a dry ice experiment in the Futures Centre and a hair raisingly electric activity in the Science area. But of course, the Library is THE place to be! (Check out some of these pop-culture Librarians if you don’t believe me!) While you’re in the Library today why not speak to the staff about our services, check out the Curiositas blog in detail, take a look at the Photography Club and CiNECiTY Film Club displays and have a quick browse at our awesome collection of books. Can you find the Shakespeare books that are over 120 years old?

Now that we’ve shared with you, it’s your turn to share your thoughts with us. As our Library Passport Activity, we’d like you to post a comment to this site telling us what you thought was the best thing you saw at FCC Open Day today. Just click on the title of this post and then scroll down to leave a comment. (You’ll need to do a quick maths equation to prove you’re NOT an evil spamming robot trying to sell us snakeskin handbags!)

Have a great day!openday

 

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EBook Lending Platform New to FCC Library!!

Our library has finally made the move to the digital world of eBooks! We have worked with a company called Wheelers to provide patrons with an easy to use lending platform. To browse the collection of fiction and non-fiction texts just click on the top link to the left of this page! 

You can also visit the site at: http://footscraycity.wheelers.co/ 

At the moment the collection is quite small but over time if they prove popular we will acquire more and more! These eBooks can be read online via the internet or offline by downloading the file to your device or netbook. This file will only be active for the loan period, which is 2 weeks. However, some books such as the classic Gutenberg titles are exempt from copyright restrictions and can be kept by all patrons. In order to borrow you must log in using your usual school username and password. Patrons may borrow up to 3 eBooks at a time.

For info about technical requirements have a look here: http://footscraycity.wheelers.co/help

9781460700273GUT74GUT36

                                

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CineCity News: RAISING ARIZONA

CiNECiTY, our Library’s film club, is back and better than ever this year! It gives students the opportunity to watch films from various time periods, genres and countries. It will take place in the cinema every Monday and Wednesday during lunch. We’ll begin on Monday 24th March with the Coen Brothers’ second feature film, the zany screwball comedy, RAISING ARIZONA.

Directed by: Joel and Ethan Coenraising_arizona

Cast: Holly Hunter

Nicolas Cage

John Goodman

William Forsythe

Written by: Ethan and Joel Coen

Genre: Comedy / Crime

Rating: M

Duration: 94 min

Colour: Colour

Country/Language: USA / English

Budget: $6,000,000 (estimated)

Year of Release: 1987

Production / Distribution Company: Circle Films 

Background notes:

  • Released on March 6, 1987 in one cinema in New York, the film spent the rest of that month opening slowly across the country. It gradually becoming a cult favorite before being recognized as a cinematic landmark.
  • The film contains some references to cult horror classic The Evil Dead on which Joel Coen had one of his first film industry jobs, as assistant editor. The zoom on Florence Arizona’s face when she discovers the kidnapping echoes a similar shot in the horror film. The McDunnoughs drive an early-’70s vintage Oldsmobile Delta 88, just like Evil Dead hero Ash (The car actually belonged to director Sam Raimi and also appeared in most of his other films including Spiderman). There’s also the low-down, hurtling tracking-shot, an innovation from Evil Dead which became a signature shot for Coen cinematographer Barry Sonnenfeld.

Things to think about:

  • All the primary adult characters break into tears at some point during the film. The only character who never cries is the baby Nathan Jr.
  • What is the significance of the matching tattoos? In what way could Smalls and H.I. be connected?
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Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming

• The following is an edited version of Neil Gaiman’s lecture for the Reading Agency, delivered on Monday October 14 at the Barbican in London which appeared on The Guardian online. The Reading Agency’s annual lecture series was initiated in 2012 as a platform for leading writers and thinkers to share original, challenging ideas about reading and libraries.

It’s important for people to tell you what side they are on and why, and whether they might be biased. A declaration of members’ interests, of a sort. So, I am going to be talking to you about reading. I’m going to tell you that libraries are important. I’m going to suggest that reading fiction, that reading for pleasure, is one of the most important things one can do. I’m going to make an impassioned plea for people to understand what libraries and librarians are, and to preserve both of these things.

And I am biased, obviously and enormously: I’m an author, often an author of fiction. I write for children and for adults. For about 30 years I have been earning my living though my words, mostly by making things up and writing them down. It is obviously in my interest for people to read, for them to read fiction, for libraries and librarians to exist and help foster a love of reading and places in which reading can occur.

Neil-GaimanSo I’m biased as a writer. But I am much, much more biased as a reader. And I am even more biased as a British citizen.

And I’m here giving this talk tonight, under the auspices of the Reading Agency: a charity whose mission is to give everyone an equal chance in life by helping people become confident and enthusiastic readers. Which supports literacy programs, and libraries and individuals and nakedly and wantonly encourages the act of reading. Because, they tell us, everything changes when we read.

And it’s that change, and that act of reading that I’m here to talk about tonight. I want to talk about what reading does. What it’s good for.

I was once in New York, and I listened to a talk about the building of private prisons – a huge growth industry in America. The prison industry needs to plan its future growth – how many cells are they going to need? How many prisoners are there going to be, 15 years from now? And they found they could predict it very easily, using a pretty simple algorithm, based on asking what percentage of 10 and 11-year-olds couldn’t read. And certainly couldn’t read for pleasure.

It’s not one to one: you can’t say that a literate society has no criminality. But there are very real correlations.

And I think some of those correlations, the simplest, come from something very simple. Literate people read fiction.

Fiction has two uses. Firstly, it’s a gateway drug to reading. The drive to know what happens next, to want to turn the page, the need to keep going, even if it’s hard, because someone’s in trouble and you have to know how it’s all going to end … that’s a very real drive. And it forces you to learn new words, to think new thoughts, to keep going. To discover that reading per se is pleasurable. Once you learn that, you’re on the road to reading everything. And reading is key. There were noises made briefly, a few years ago, about the idea that we were living in a post-literate world, in which the ability to make sense out of written words was somehow redundant, but those days are gone: words are more important than they ever were: we navigate the world with words, and as the world slips onto the web, we need to follow, to communicate and to comprehend what we are reading. People who cannot understand each other cannot exchange ideas, cannot communicate, and translation programs only go so far.

The simplest way to make sure that we raise literate children is to teach them to read, and to show them that reading is a pleasurable activity. And that means, at its simplest, finding books that they enjoy, giving them access to those books, and letting them read them.

I don’t think there is such a thing as a bad book for children. Every now and again it becomes fashionable among some adults to point at a subset of children’s books, a genre, perhaps, or an author, and to declare them bad books, books that children should be stopped from reading. I’ve seen it happen over and over; Enid Blyton was declared a bad author, so was RL Stine, so were dozens of others. Comics have been decried as fostering illiteracy.

It’s tosh. It’s snobbery and it’s foolishness. There are no bad authors for children, that children like and want to read and seek out, because every child is different. They can find the stories they need to, and they bring themselves to stories. A hackneyed, worn-out idea isn’t hackneyed and worn out to them. This is the first time the child has encountered it. Do not discourage children from reading because you feel they are reading the wrong thing. Fiction you do not like is a route to other books you may prefer. And not everyone has the same taste as you.

Well-meaning adults can easily destroy a child’s love of reading: stop them reading what they enjoy, or give them worthy-but-dull books that you like, the 21st-century equivalents of Victorian “improving” literature. You’ll wind up with a generation convinced that reading is uncool and worse, unpleasant.

We need our children to get onto the reading ladder: anything that they enjoy reading will move them up, rung by rung, into literacy. (Also, do not do what this author did when his 11-year-old daughter was into RL Stine, which is to go and get a copy of Stephen King’s Carrie, saying if you liked those you’ll love this! Holly read nothing but safe stories of settlers on prairies for the rest of her teenage years, and still glares at me when Stephen King’s name is mentioned.)

And the second thing fiction does is to build empathy. When you watch TV or see a film, you are looking at things happening to other people. Prose fiction is something you build up from 26 letters and a handful of punctuation marks, and you, and you alone, using your imagination, create a world and people it and look out through other eyes. You get to feel things, visit places and worlds you would never otherwise know. You learn that everyone else out there is a me, as well. You’re being someone else, and when you return to your own world, you’re going to be slightly changed.

Empathy is a tool for building people into groups, for allowing us to function as more than self-obsessed individuals.

You’re also finding out something as you read vitally important for making your way in the world. And it’s this:

The world doesn’t have to be like this. Things can be different.

I was in China in 2007, at the first party-approved science fiction and fantasy convention in Chinese history. And at one point I took a top official aside and asked him Why? SF had been disapproved of for a long time. What had changed?

It’s simple, he told me. The Chinese were brilliant at making things if other people brought them the plans. But they did not innovate and they did not invent. They did not imagine. So they sent a delegation to the US, to Apple, to Microsoft, to Google, and they asked the people there who were inventing the future about themselves. And they found that all of them had read science fiction when they were boys or girls.

Fiction can show you a different world. It can take you somewhere you’ve never been. Once you’ve visited other worlds, like those who ate fairy fruit, you can never be entirely content with the world that you grew up in. Discontent is a good thing: discontented people can modify and improve their worlds, leave them better, leave them different.

And while we’re on the subject, I’d like to say a few words about escapism. I hear the term bandied about as if it’s a bad thing. As if “escapist” fiction is a cheap opiate used by the muddled and the foolish and the deluded, and the only fiction that is worthy, for adults or for children, is mimetic fiction, mirroring the worst of the world the reader finds herself in.

If you were trapped in an impossible situation, in an unpleasant place, with people who meant you ill, and someone offered you a temporary escape, why wouldn’t you take it? And escapist fiction is just that: fiction that opens a door, shows the sunlight outside, gives you a place to go where you are in control, are with people you want to be with(and books are real places, make no mistake about that); and more importantly, during your escape, books can also give you knowledge about the world and your predicament, give you weapons, give you armour: real things you can take back into your prison. Skills and knowledge and tools you can use to escape for real.

As JRR Tolkien reminded us, the only people who inveigh against escape are jailers.

Another way to destroy a child’s love of reading, of course, is to make sure there are no books of any kind around. And to give them nowhere to read those books. I was lucky. I had an excellent local library growing up. I had the kind of parents who could be persuaded to drop me off in the library on their way to work in summer holidays, and the kind of librarians who did not mind a small, unaccompanied boy heading back into the children’s library every morning and working his way through the card catalogue, looking for books with ghosts or magic or rockets in them, looking for vampires or detectives or witches or wonders. And when I had finished reading the children’s’ library I began on the adult books.

They were good librarians. They liked books and they liked the books being read. They taught me how to order books from other libraries on inter-library loans. They had no snobbery about anything I read. They just seemed to like that there was this wide-eyed little boy who loved to read, and would talk to me about the books I was reading, they would find me other books in a series, they would help. They treated me as another reader – nothing less or more – which meant they treated me with respect. I was not used to being treated with respect as an eight-year-old.

But libraries are about freedom. Freedom to read, freedom of ideas, freedom of communication. They are about education (which is not a process that finishes the day we leave school or university), about entertainment, about making safe spaces, and about access to information.

I worry that here in the 21st century people misunderstand what libraries are and the purpose of them. If you perceive a library as a shelf of books, it may seem antiquated or outdated in a world in which most, but not all, books in print exist digitally. But that is to miss the point fundamentally.

I think it has to do with nature of information. Information has value, and the right information has enormous value. For all of human history, we have lived in a time of information scarcity, and having the needed information was always important, and always worth something: when to plant crops, where to find things, maps and histories and stories – they were always good for a meal and company. Information was a valuable thing, and those who had it or could obtain it could charge for that service.

In the last few years, we’ve moved from an information-scarce economy to one driven by an information glut. According to Eric Schmidt of Google, every two days now the human race creates as much information as we did from the dawn of civilisation until 2003. That’s about five exobytes of data a day, for those of you keeping score. The challenge becomes, not finding that scarce plant growing in the desert, but finding a specific plant growing in a jungle. We are going to need help navigating that information to find the thing we actually need.

Libraries are places that people go to for information. Books are only the tip of the information iceberg: they are there, and libraries can provide you freely and legally with books. More children are borrowing books from libraries than ever before – books of all kinds: paper and digital and audio. But libraries are also, for example, places that people, who may not have computers, who may not have internet connections, can go online without paying anything: hugely important when the way you find out about jobs, apply for jobs or apply for benefits is increasingly migrating exclusively online. Librarians can help these people navigate that world.

I do not believe that all books will or should migrate onto screens: as Douglas Adams once pointed out to me, more than 20 years before the Kindle turned up, a physical book is like a shark. Sharks are old: there were sharks in the ocean before the dinosaurs. And the reason there are still sharks around is that sharks are better at being sharks than anything else is. Physical books are tough, hard to destroy, bath-resistant, solar-operated, feel good in your hand: they are good at being books, and there will always be a place for them. They belong in libraries, just as libraries have already become places you can go to get access to ebooks, and audiobooks and DVDs and web content.

A library is a place that is a repository of information and gives every citizen equal access to it. That includes health information. And mental health information. It’s a community space. It’s a place of safety, a haven from the world. It’s a place with librarians in it. What the libraries of the future will be like is something we should be imagining now.

Literacy is more important than ever it was, in this world of text and email, a world of written information. We need to read and write, we need global citizens who can read comfortably, comprehend what they are reading, understand nuance, and make themselves understood.

Libraries really are the gates to the future. So it is unfortunate that, round the world, we observe local authorities seizing the opportunity to close libraries as an easy way to save money, without realising that they are stealing from the future to pay for today. They are closing the gates that should be open.

According to a recent study by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, England is the “only country where the oldest age group has higher proficiency in both literacy and numeracy than the youngest group, after other factors, such as gender, socio-economic backgrounds and type of occupations are taken into account”.

Or to put it another way, our children and our grandchildren are less literate and less numerate than we are. They are less able to navigate the world, to understand it to solve problems. They can be more easily lied to and misled, will be less able to change the world in which they find themselves, be less employable. All of these things. And as a country, England will fall behind other developed nations because it will lack a skilled workforce.

Books are the way that we communicate with the dead. The way that we learn lessons from those who are no longer with us, that humanity has built on itself, progressed, made knowledge incremental rather than something that has to be relearned, over and over. There are tales that are older than most countries, tales that have long outlasted the cultures and the buildings in which they were first told.

I think we have responsibilities to the future. Responsibilities and obligations to children, to the adults those children will become, to the world they will find themselves inhabiting. All of us – as readers, as writers, as citizens – have obligations. I thought I’d try and spell out some of these obligations here.

I believe we have an obligation to read for pleasure, in private and in public places. If we read for pleasure, if others see us reading, then we learn, we exercise our imaginations. We show others that reading is a good thing.

We have an obligation to support libraries. To use libraries, to encourage others to use libraries, to protest the closure of libraries. If you do not value libraries then you do not value information or culture or wisdom. You are silencing the voices of the past and you are damaging the future.

We have an obligation to read aloud to our children. To read them things they enjoy. To read to them stories we are already tired of. To do the voices, to make it interesting, and not to stop reading to them just because they learn to read to themselves. Use reading-aloud time as bonding time, as time when no phones are being checked, when the distractions of the world are put aside.

We have an obligation to use the language. To push ourselves: to find out what words mean and how to deploy them, to communicate clearly, to say what we mean. We must not to attempt to freeze language, or to pretend it is a dead thing that must be revered, but we should use it as a living thing, that flows, that borrows words, that allows meanings and pronunciations to change with time.

We writers – and especially writers for children, but all writers – have an obligation to our readers: it’s the obligation to write true things, especially important when we are creating tales of people who do not exist in places that never were – to understand that truth is not in what happens but what it tells us about who we are. Fiction is the lie that tells the truth, after all. We have an obligation not to bore our readers, but to make them need to turn the pages. One of the best cures for a reluctant reader, after all, is a tale they cannot stop themselves from reading. And while we must tell our readers true things and give them weapons and give them armour and pass on whatever wisdom we have gleaned from our short stay on this green world, we have an obligation not to preach, not to lecture, not to force predigested morals and messages down our readers’ throats like adult birds feeding their babies pre-masticated maggots; and we have an obligation never, ever, under any circumstances, to write anything for children that we would not want to read ourselves.

We have an obligation to understand and to acknowledge that as writers for children we are doing important work, because if we mess it up and write dull books that turn children away from reading and from books, we ‘ve lessened our own future and diminished theirs.

We all – adults and children, writers and readers – have an obligation to daydream. We have an obligation to imagine. It is easy to pretend that nobody can change anything, that we are in a world in which society is huge and the individual is less than nothing: an atom in a wall, a grain of rice in a rice field. But the truth is, individuals change their world over and over, individuals make the future, and they do it by imagining that things can be different.

Look around you: I mean it. Pause, for a moment and look around the room that you are in. I’m going to point out something so obvious that it tends to be forgotten. It’s this: that everything you can see, including the walls, was, at some point, imagined. Someone decided it was easier to sit on a chair than on the ground and imagined the chair. Someone had to imagine a way that I could talk to you in London right now without us all getting rained on. This room and the things in it, and all the other things in this building, this city, exist because, over and over and over, people imagined things.

We have an obligation to make things beautiful. Not to leave the world uglier than we found it, not to empty the oceans, not to leave our problems for the next generation. We have an obligation to clean up after ourselves, and not leave our children with a world we’ve shortsightedly messed up, shortchanged, and crippled.

We have an obligation to tell our politicians what we want, to vote against politicians of whatever party who do not understand the value of reading in creating worthwhile citizens, who do not want to act to preserve and protect knowledge and encourage literacy. This is not a matter of party politics. This is a matter of common humanity.

Albert Einstein was asked once how we could make our children intelligent. His reply was both simple and wise. “If you want your children to be intelligent,” he said, “read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.” He understood the value of reading, and of imagining. I hope we can give our children a world in which they will read, and be read to, and imagine, and understand.

Taken from: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/oct/15/neil-gaiman-future-libraries-reading-daydreaming

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Global Express is looking for young contributers…

global-front-300x213Express Media (the people behind VOICEWORKS magazine for young writers) are looking for up to 15 young people aged 12 – 29 years who have a migrant or refugee background to be part of an exciting creative expression and writing workshop series in the Melbourne CBD.

Workshops will be held fortnightly between February and May 2014.
Workshops will be at The Wheeler Centre on Little Lonsdale St, Melbourne.
All workshops are free!!
Write and create and/or perform original works.
You get paid $100 for your final submission piece and it will also be published.
All published pieces will be launched in mid-2014.
If you have stories to tell and something to express they want to hear from you!
These workshops will be Auslan-interpreted and wheelchair-accessible.
To enquire or apply contact them on:
p. (03) 9094 7891 or
e. global@expressmedia.org.au
w. www.expressmedia.org.au
When applying make sure to include:
Your name, age, address, languages spoken at home
A bit about why you want to be a part of these workshops and what you would like to get out of them/learn
A sample of your work (Stories, lyrics, poetry etc)
Applications close Friday January 31, 2014.
This project is a partnership between CMY (Centre for Multicultural Youth), Express Media and Banyule City Council with the support of the Australia Council for the Arts through the Community Partnerships Board and Arts Victoria through the Community Partnerships initiative.

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Someone please cover up these covers!! Urgh!

We’ve all heard the phrase “don’t judge a book by it’s cover” which is generally a good rule of thumb. But it really becomes gospel when publishers make terrible decisions about their covers. Have a look here at some of the appalling cover images bestowed upon some very well known books, as compiled by ‘flavorwire.com’.

For example:

Really? No, I mean REALLY!?!

 

 

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New to the shelves!

FCC Library is always buying new fiction books to add to our amazing collection. Here are a few to whet your appetite, but there are many, many more. Just speak to the library staff to help find the perfect book for you!

Vango: Between Sky and Earth by Timothee De Fombelle

vangoA gripping mystery-adventure set in the 1930s interwar period about a character desperately searching for his identity. Raised by a strange nanny in Sicily, Vango grows up with one friend, a priest Zefiro, who lives in a monastery hidden from sight. On reaching adulthood, Vango decides to follow in Zefiro’s steps, but at the moment he is taking his holy orders at Notre Dame in Paris, he is falsely accused of a crime and has to go on the run. This is a breathless and highly cinematic story that follows Vango traveling by Zeppelin across Europe from Stromboli to Nazi Germany, from Scotland to the Soviet Union, climbing the rooftops of Paris, crossing the paths of arms traffickers, crooked policemen, Russian spies and even Stalin.

Vicious by V.E. Schwabbvicious

In Vicious, V. E. Schwab brings to life a gritty comic-book-style world in vivid prose: a world where gaining superpowers doesn’t automatically lead to heroism, and a time when allegiances are called into question. Victor and Eli started out as college roommates—brilliant, arrogant, lonely boys who recognized the same sharpness and ambition in each other. In their senior year, a shared research interest in adrenaline, near-death experiences, and seemingly supernatural events reveals an intriguing possibility: that under the right conditions, someone could develop extraordinary abilities. But when their thesis moves from the academic to the experimental, things go horribly wrong.

The Last Girl by Michael Adams

The end of the world happens in the blink of an eye. When The Snap sweeps the globe, everyone can instantly hear everything that everyone else is thinking. As secrets and lies are laid bare, suburbs and cities explode into insanity and violence. What might have been an evolutionary leap instead initiates the apocalypse. Sixteen-year-old Danby Armstrong’s telepathy works very differently. She can tune into other people but they can’t tune into her. With only this slender defence, Danby must protect her little brother and reach the safety of her mother’s mountain retreat. But it’s 100 kilometres away and the highways are blocked by thousands of cars and surrounded by millions of people coming apart at the psychic seams.

Rules of Summer by Shaun Tanrules-of-summer

Combining humour and surreal fantasy, Shaun Tan pictures a summer in the lives of two boys. Each spread tells of an event and the lesson learned. By turns, these events become darker and more sinister as the boys push their games further and further.

Flora & Ulysses by Kate DiCamillo

flora-ulysses-402x541A laugh-out-loud story filled with eccentric, endearing characters and featuring an exciting new format—a novel interspersed with comic-style graphic sequences and full-page illustrations, all rendered in black-and-white by up-and-coming artist K.G. Campbell. It begins, as the best superhero stories do, with a tragic accident that has unexpected consequences. The squirrel never saw the vacuum cleaner coming, but self-described cynic Flora Belle Buckman, who has read every issue of the comic book Terrible Things Can Happen to You! is just the right person to step in and save him.

More Than This by Patrick NessMore-Than-This

A boy named Seth drowns, desperate and alone in his final moments, losing his life as the pounding sea claims him. But then he wakes. He is naked, thirsty, starving. But alive. How is that possible? He remembers dying, his bones breaking, his skull dashed upon the rocks. So how is he here? And where is this place? It looks like the suburban English town where he lived as a child, before an unthinkable tragedy happened and his family moved to America. But the neighborhood around his old house is overgrown, covered in dust, and completely abandoned. What’s going on? And why is it that whenever he closes his eyes, he falls prey to vivid, agonizing memories that seem more real than the world around him? Seth begins a search for answers, hoping that he might not be alone, that this might not be the hell he fears it to be, that there might be more than just this. . .

 

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CineCity News: ROSEMARY’S BABY

Today we will screen the first session of our HALLOWEEN SPECIAL for CineCity, the 1968 horror classic Rosemary’s Baby. This very creepy movie is a brilliant example of filmmaking at its finest. The cinematography, writing and acting performances all come together to create a feeling of unease and tension. There is also some very interesting social commentary underlining the film which is just as pertinant now as it was in the sixties. As a librarian I must also recommend the writing of Ira Levin, who penned the original novel. We have a number of his books in our collection and he is a personal favourite of mine. Stephen King has described Ira Levin as “the Swiss watchmaker of suspense novels, he makes what the rest of us do look like cheap watchmakers in drugstores.” Chuck Palahniuk, in Stranger Than Fiction: True Stories, calls Levin’s writing “a smart, updated version of the kind of folksy legends that cultures have always used.”

Directed by: Roman Polanski

Cast:  Mia Farrow

            John Cassavetes

            Ruth Gordon

            Sidney Blackmer

Written by:    Roman PolanskiRosemarybaby

Based on the novel by Ira Levin

Genre: Thriller / Horror / Mystery /Drama

Rating: M

Duration: 136min 

Colour: Color (Technicolor)

Country/Language: USA /English

Budget: $2,300,000 (estimated)

Gross: $33,395,426 (USA)

Year of Release: 1968

Production / Distribution Company:

William Castle Productions

 

Background notes:

  • This was the first film that Polanski made in the USA after making quite a few films in various European countries including his native Poland.
  • Ruth Gordon won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress which made this film the only horror movie to win an Oscar for acting until The Silence of the Lambs in 1991.

 

Things to think about:

  • How is the film working to build suspense and tension? Consider the film elements like mise-en-scene, cinematography and sound…
  • Can this film be seen as a feminist text? Bear in mind the 1960s culture when it was made. How much control does Rosemary have over her life and her body? How does this comment on patriarchal society?
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The difference a library can make….

The documentary film Gateway to the World takes place in Namibia’s capital city Windhoek, Katutura suburban area. In the film, two young library users are followed around the poor Greenwell Matongo area, where the local library functions as the people’s gateway to better life. Twenty year old Trevelin did not pass the 10th grade of schooling and ended up as one of the many out-of school youths in the area. Persuaded by a friend, he found his way to the nearby library and became interested in studying computers. He is now giving basic computer classes as a volunteer teacher in the library. Anna, 13 years, is a schoolgirl at the Olof Palme primary school. Every day after school she heads up to the Greenwell library where she is one of the library prefects. She helps other school kids with their homework, helps library customers with computer usage and plays with children, for whom the library is one of the region’s few safe havens. All the hours spent at the library have also reflected positively on Anna’s school results and in the future she intends to continue studying to become an engineer.

The Greenwell Matongo Library was initially founded in cooperation between the cities of Windhoek and Vantaa (Finland). The target was to bring the library services down to the grassroots level. The library was opened in 2005, and today it may well be that the library has even exceeded the expectations laid out for it. The public has embraced the library and there are so many users that there is hardly enough room to accommodate everyone. Nowadays the Greenwell Matongo Library also serves as an example library to the Libraries for Development project, which started in 2012 and is administered by the Finnish Library Association. The good lessons learnt from Greenwell will thus be extended both around Namibia (20 libraries) and even to Tanzania (2 libraries in the initial phase).

Length: 29 min

Language: English

Subtitles: English

Written and Directed by Tuomas Lipponen

Camera operator: Panu Somerma

Editor: Petri Mäkitalo

Sound post production: Jukka Putkinen

Produced by: Kirjastokaista – Kirjastot.fi, 2013

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It’s Raining Diamonds!

Researchers believe diamonds could be falling from the sky on Saturn and Jupiter!

The atmospheres of our solar system’s gas giants are perfect for creating diamonds, according to new atmospheric data.  Methane is transformed into soot (carbon) in huge lightning storms high in the atmosphere. When it falls it hardens into chunks of graphite and then diamond.  Read this BBC News article for more info.

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