What is Literature for?

Here’s a neat little video from The School of Life about why we need literature in our lives… enjoy! :)

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Register now for THE BIG READ!!

bigreadIn celebration of national literacy week, the library will be hosting THE BIG READ on Tuesday 2nd September Periods 5&6. This is a fun-filled event with prizes galore! We’ll be running a game show style literature quiz with heaps of challenges. Students are also invited to dress up as a book/movie/comic character they connect with and be in the running for the Best Dressed Prizes! You must register your interest if you want to come along. To do this, just fill out the registration form and place it in the box on the library desk. Everyone is welcome so register now!

 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail this to someone

CiNECiTY NEWS: Ed Wood

This week in Cinecity we began watching Tim Burton’s zany biopic Ed Wood. It chronicles the B-grade filmmaker’s entry into Hollywood and the making of Plan 9 From Outer Space which has been labelled as ‘the worst film ever made’. It also gives us an insight into why his films were so bad, with trademarks like illogical continuity, bizarre narratives and terrible acting and set design. We’ll follow up Ed Wood with a screening of Plan 9 From Outer Space next month.  


Directed by: Tim BurtonEd-Wood_poster

Cast:  Johnny Depp

Martin Landau

Sarah Jessica Parker

Bill Murray

Written by:    Scott Alexander

Larry Karaszewski

Genre: Biography / Comedy / Drama

Rating: M

Duration: 121 min

Colour: Black & White

Country/Language: USA / English

Year of Release: 1994

Background notes:

  • This film was critically acclaimed, winning two Academy Awards: Best Supporting Actor for Landau and Best Makeup for Rick Baker (who designed Landau’s prosthetic makeup), Ve Neill and Yolanda Toussieng. However it was a box office disappointment, making only $5.9 million against an $18 million budget.
  • In the 1950s, Ed Wood made numerous low-budget, B-Grade science fiction, horror and cowboy genre films. In 1980, he was posthumously awarded a Golden Turkey Award as Worst Director of All Time, renewing public interest in his work. Wood’s career and camp approach has earned him and his films a cult following.

Things to think about:

  • Do you think Tim Burton’s film presents the director Ed Wood in a positive way? Do you think Burton was influenced or inspired by Wood? Why?
  • Think about how a film director’s role includes being an artist, a business person, a politician, an organizer and leader? Was Ed Wood really a terrible director? What was he good at?
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail this to someone

WRITE 4 FUN COMPETITION! Great prizes on offer!!

write4funEntry is now open in the 2014 Schools Writing Competition! Students all over Australia are invited to enter their Short Stories OR Poems, and battle it out for the great cash prizes on offer! This year – there is NO THEME!! Entrants are encouraged to let their imaginations run wild and get their creative juices flowing to write on any topic or style. All year levels welcome! Enter online at: www.write4fun.net or email to: enter@write4fun.net

Entries close on August 31st! See John Box or Library staff for details. Good Luck!!

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail this to someone

CiNECiTY NEWS: Rebel Without a Cause

To end the term our film club has been watching the classic teenpic, Rebel Without a Cause.

Directed by:Nicholas Rayrebel

Cast:  James Dean

Natalie Wood

Sal Mineo

Jim Backus

Written by: Stewart Stern

Genre: Drama / Romance

Rating: PG

Duration: 106 min

Colour: Colour

Country/Language: USA / English

Year of Release: 1955

Background notes:

  • This film is considered a classic partly because of the iconic performance of James Dean (his last of only three). It first screened at the Astor Theatre in New York on 29th Oct 1955, only one month after Dean crashed his sports car on the highway and died aged 24.
  • After WWII, many films (like The Wild One) demonized teens and portrayed them as wild delinquents. ‘Rebel’ attempted to understand the teenage psyche and portray their feelings of disconnectedness and angst. It also comments on the generation gap as it was in 50s America and criticizes parental approaches to their children.

Things to think about:

  • Nicholas Ray is a master of mise-en-scene. Watch carefully and think about how Ray uses elements of mise-en-scene to help tell the story. Pay particular attention to costume, colour, framing and props.
  • Think about how the family unit is portrayed in the film? What about the roles of men and women? The film reflects the values of society in the USA of the 1950s, is this how things are now?
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail this to someone

MELBOURNE WRITERS FESTIVAL EXCURSION!

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail this to someone

CiNECiTY NEWS: The 400 Blows

We’ve been watching this French classic about a misunderstood young boy who turns to a life of crime…

Directed by:François Truffautthe-400-blows-poster

Cast:  Jean-Pierre Léaud

Albert Rémy

Claire Maurier

Written by: François Truffaut

Marcel Moussy

Genre: Crime / Drama

Rating: PG

Duration: 95min

Colour: Black & White

Country/Language: France / French

Year of Release: 1959

Background notes:

  • This is one of the defining films of the Nouvelle Vague (French New Wave) and displays many of the characteristic traits of the movement. Some of these traits include:a documentary style with long tracking shots and handheld camera shots, discontinuous editing such as jump cuts, existential themes, a low budget, improvised dialogue, rapid changes of scene and ambiguous endings. Such forms of expression were previously extremely uncommon in cinema but are used frequently today. The Nouvelle Vague also laid the groundwork for a set of concepts, revolutionary at the time, which the American film critic Andrew Sarris called auteur theory.
  • François Truffaut, along with many other French New Wave directors, began as a critic for the famous film magazine Cahiers du Cinema.
  • Cahiers du Cinema co-founder and theorist André Bazin was a prominent source of influence for the movement and was a father figure for Truffaut. This film is the first of a series of semi-autobiographical films with the lead character Antoine representing the real life Truffaut.

Things to think about:

  • While watching the film try to be aware of some of the traits mentioned above.
  • In the final shot of the film the frame freezes leaving a question about the fate of Antoine? What do you think happens next? What happens to him in the future?
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail this to someone

WE ARE ALWAYS GETTING NEW BOOKS…

FCC Library is always buying new books to add to our amazing collection. Here are a few to peak your interest, but there are many, many more. Just speak to the library staff to help find the perfect book for you!


 

the lost boyTHE LOST BOY by Greg Ruth

Nate’s not happy about his family moving to a new house in a new town. After all, nobody asked him if he wanted to move in the first place. But when he discovers a tape recorder and note addressed to him under the floorboards of his bedroom, Nate is thrust into a dark mystery about a boy who went missing many, many years ago. Now, as strange happenings and weird creatures begin to track Nate, he must partner with Tabitha, a local girl, to find out what they want with him. But time is running out, for a powerful force is gathering strength in the woods at the edge of town, and before long Nate and Tabitha will be forced to confront a terrifying foe, and uncover the truth about the Lost Boy. Some mysteries are too dangerous to leave alone . . .

 


GRASSHOPPER JUNGLE by Andrew Smithgrasshopperjungle

In the small town of Ealing, Iowa, Austin and his best friend, Robby, have accidentally unleashed an unstoppable army. An army of horny, hungry, six-foot-tall praying mantises that only want to do two things. This is the truth. This is history. It’s the end of the world. And nobody knows anything about it. You know what I mean. Funny, intense, complex, and brave, Grasshopper Jungle brilliantly weaves together everything from testicle-dissolving genetically modified corn to the struggles of recession-era, small-town America in this ground breaking coming-of-age stunner.

 


STUNGSTUNG by Bethany Wiggins

Fiona doesn’t remember going to sleep. But when she opens her eyes, she discovers her entire world has been altered-her house is abandoned and broken, and the entire neighbourhood is barren and dead. Even stranger is the tattoo on her right wrist-a black oval with five marks on either side-that she doesn’t remember getting but somehow knows she must cover at any cost. And she’s right. When the honeybee population collapsed, a worldwide pandemic occurred and the government tried to bio-engineer a cure. Only the solution was deadlier than the original problem-the vaccination turned people into ferocious, deadly beasts who were branded as a warning to un-vaccinated survivors. Key people needed to rebuild society are protected from disease and beasts inside a fortress-like wall. But Fiona has awakened branded, alone-and on the wrong side of the wall . . .


 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail this to someone

PAST AUTHOR TALKS AT FCC

Take a look at these fantastic talks by famous authors to Footscray City College students…

 


The lovely librarians at Scotch College in Hawthorn invited us to attend this talk by Christopher Paolini in August 2012.


Lauren Oliver visited our school early in 2012 thanks to the awesome people at the Sun Bookshop.


On the 13th August 2013 A.J. Betts visited our library to discuss her book Zac & Mia thanks again to the Sun Bookshop.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail this to someone

CiNECiTY NEWS: The Thin Blue Line

Directed by:Errol Morristhe_thin_blue_line_(1988)movie_

Cast: Randall Adams

David Harris

Music by: Philip Glass

Genre: Documentary / Crime / Mystery

Rating: PG

Duration: 98min

Colour: Colour

Country/Language: USA / English

Year of Release: 1988

 

Background notes:

  • Errol Morris was researching prosecution psychiatrist Dr. James Grigson, known as Doctor Death, and was planning to make a documentary about him. During this research he met Randall Adams and became skeptical that Adams was guilty.
  • The Thin Blue Line won Best Documentary honors from the New York Film Critics Circle, the Kansas City Film Critics Circle, the National Board of Review, and the National Society of Film Critics. The film was marketed as “nonfiction” rather than as a documentary which disqualified it from being considered in that category for an Academy Award.
  • Adams’ case was reviewed and he was released from prison approximately a year after the film’s release.

 

Things to think about:

  • In a 2008 interview in the New York Times Morris said,”The difficulty with images is not suspending disbelief but rather the opposite-suspending our natural tendency to believe in their veracity. The seeing-is-believing principle.” Do you think the use of dramatic re-enactments in The Thin Blue Line is meant to simulate reality or to create doubt in the viewer?
  • Morris also said that he “wanted to make a film about how truth was difficult to know, not impossible to know”. Does Morris achieve his goal? Think about the use of music, non-linear time sequence, the addition of lots of minute details and the way the interviewees look directly at the camera when giving their statements…
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditEmail this to someone